East indian Coconut Cake Recipe

East Indian Coconut Cake Recipe

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My cousin Dan says this coconut cake is his favorite East Indian sweet. It’s mine too! The coconut cake is just a little different from the traditional East Indian Thali Sweet. Okay, maybe it’s a lot different. After all, it’s got loads more eggs in it. But if you don’t have time to make the batter and leave it overnight, the coconut cake is an easier option.

Here are the ingredients I used:
7 Whole Eggs
2 Egg Yolks
380 Grams Butter
480 Grams Fine Sugar
1 Tsp Vanilla Essence
420 Grams Sojee (Semolina)
300 Grams Grated Coconut

So let’s get to it. How to make a simple version of the East Indian Coconut Cake?

Take eggs in a vessel - Pic by Sarah from TheWingedFork
Take eggs in a vessel

Some people say you should beat the yellows and the whites separately, but we don’t do it. Just put all the eggs in a toap (that’s what we call a vessel in Eastya) and beat together till they’re light and fluffy.

Beat eggs till light and fluffy - Pic by Sarah from TheWingedFork
Beat eggs till light and fluffy
Mix butter and sugar - Pic by Sarah from TheWingedFork
Mix butter and sugar

Add in the butter and sugar and blend together.

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Add in sojee baking powder, grated coconut and mix well - Pic by Sarah from TheWingedFork
Add in sojee baking powder, grated coconut and mix well

In another vessel, mix the baking powder and sojee (semolina) together before adding in the grated coconut. Sojee or suji is just great isn’t it? You can use it in so many dishes, from sweet to savory. We love sojee upma, and cutlets encrusted with suji, and my granny’s version of East Indian honey balls.

Lastly, add in a tsp of vanilla essence and mix well.

Line baking trays with butter paper and fill with the batter - Pic by Sarah from TheWingedFork
Line baking trays with butter paper and fill with the batter

Line trays with butter paper and grease them with butter. Fill in the batter and leave to rise for an hour or so. Then preheat your oven for 5 minutes to about 200 degrees Celsius. Put your cake trays in the oven and bake for about 50 minutes.

Bake till the cake has risen beautifully - Pic by Sarah from TheWingedFork
Bake till the cake has risen beautifully

And that’s it! The easy East Indian Coconut Cake is ready. Eat it hot or eat it cold, it tastes as delicious as my sister’s gluten free sand cake!

Coconut Cake Recipe - By Sarah from TheWingedFork

Did you try out this recipe? Give us your review below! And make sure to share your delicious creations by tagging us on Instagram or join TheWingedFork Facebook group and share your lovely food pics and results of your food experiments there!

East indian Coconut Cake Recipe

East Indian Coconut Cake

Sarah
The East Indian Coconut Cake is a delicious and simply easier version of the Thalie Sweet. Here's how to make the East Indian Coconut Cake.
5 from 1 vote
Prep Time 30 mins
Cook Time 50 mins
Resting Time 1 hr
Total Time 2 hrs 20 mins
Course Dessert
Cuisine East Indian

Ingredients
  

  • 7 Eggs
  • 2 Egg Yolks
  • 380 gms Butter
  • 480 gms Fine Sugar
  • 1 tsp Vanilla Essence
  • 420 gms Semolina (Semolina)
  • 300 gms Coconut Grated

Instructions
 

  • Beat the eggs till they're light and fluffy.
  • Add in the butter and sugar and mix together till smooth.
  • Next add in sojee, baking powder, grated coconut and mix well.
  • Line baking trays with butter paper and grease well.
  • Preheat the oven to 200 degrees Celsius for 10 minutes.
  • Bake the cakes for 50 minutes.
  • Cut and serve.
Coconut Cake Recipe - By Sarah from TheWingedFork

3 thoughts on “East Indian Coconut Cake Recipe”

  1. This conversation at the beginning is of goankars not east Indians because they are the ones who always say men. What men, no men etc. They are also called pavwallas as when they came from Goa they used to sell pavs. East Indians used to make handbreads and bhaat is a goan cake similar to EIs thali sweet.

    Reply
    • Hi Shanila, are you referring to the conversation in this post? https://thewingedfork.com/east-indian-christmas/
      In the post, they’re sprinkled in liberally for poetic effect, but we sometimes use these terms when we’re around family or other East Indians too. “What men?” “No men!” “Come on men!” “How men?” “Yes men, tomorrow!” Don’t you think that these colloquialisms are part of East Indian conversation just like “re” has become a part of it?

      Reply

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