Mass Pav or (Moulded) Marzipan : East Indian Series

Growing up, the house started smelling of Christmas from early December. Literally! You could smell marzipan, vanilla cream, thali sweet, cordial, Christmas cake and so much more. The best part of being East Indian though, was tasting the smells. Or rather eating the Christmas sweets that weren’t good enough to give to relatives and were handed over to us kids. 😉 It was also taking a nibble while making some of them. Shh!

One of my favourites was marzipan. Not the stirring for hours to make it, but the part where we mould it into these tiny colourful shapes – flowers, fruits, stars, angels and more.

Now everyone knows that mass-pav or marzipan is made of a paste of almonds (Marzipan No 1) or cashews (Marzipan No 2) cooked with sugar, egg whites and rose water on a slow fire stirring continuously till it forms a waxy mass. And then starts the real work of kneading it, putting it into moulds and forming all these amazing shapes.

On a side note, when I spent those 2 years in the UK studying for my Masters, I tried to find marzipan forms or marzipan moulds one Christmas. I went to about 7 or 8 stores before finally giving up on it. The only question they kept asking me was, you mean you actually mould the marzipan? It seemed like a very strange notion to them. they use it on cakes, but not as shapes by themselves. And I went to a couple of famous stores too! But no luck.

I’ve since found that Brazil and Portugal make fruit shaped marzipan; parts of Spain like Toledo make animal shaped marzipan; Norway and Denmark make marzipan shaped pigs for Christmas; Belgium and Netherlands use marzipan figures on St. Nick’s eve. If you have more info, I’d love to add it here.

But anyways, back to the East Indian marzipan. We mould them and leave them out to dry. And every day a few of them quietly vanish. Who’s stealing the marzipan and quietly eating them? Probably Albert, our friendly ghost.

Marzipan left out to dry - TheWingedFork
Marzipan left out to dry

East Indian Marzipan Recipe

Here is the recipe we use. Marzipan No 2 modified to granny’s measurements. Dad’s side does Mazripan No 1, but don’t you think it’s really tedious to blanch the almonds?

  • Half kg Cashewnuts
  • Three quarter kg ground Sugar
  • 4 Egg Whites
  • 1 chowni Rose Water (for kneading)
  • 1 to 2 chownis Rose Water (for grinding)
  • 2 to 3 drops Almond Essence

* Note : Chownis aka East Indian wine glasses usually measure 30 ml or 45 ml. We use the 45 ml measurement.

Angels, stars, santa, bells and tree shaped Marzipan - TheWingedFork
Angels, stars, santa, bells and tree shaped Marzipan

Grind the cashewnuts to a paste with rose water. Aren’t we lucky that nowadays we can use the mixie and don’t need to grind cashewnuts on the patha? That’s probably why our grandparents were stronger than us. They worked harder.

By the way, cashewnuts and almonds are essentially gluten free, but may come in contact with other ingredients that contain gluten depending on the facility in which they’re processed. So if you want to ensure that your marzipan is gluten free, just get your nuts from the right facility. Did that sound corny? Haha!

Sprinkle a thali or thala with powder sugar and keep aside.

Next, put the cashewnut paste into a toap (vessel) along with the ground sugar, almond essence and egg whites.

On a low flame, stir till it reaches a wax like consistency. Seriously, that’s a lot a stirring. If you’ve helped with stirring sweets as a kid, you’ll have strong arms.

Once the mixture is quite dry, pour it into a thala aka thali and knead till it’s mouldable. Form into 4 or 5 different colored balls and set aside.

Next, sprinkle the moulds with some powdered sugar. Mould the marzipan into tiny balls and place into moulds till they form the required shapes. Leave out to dry overnight. And that’s it. The marzipan is ready to be sent out to friends and family.

East Indian Cashewnut Marzipan Recipe

The East Indian Cashewnut Marzipan is a Christmas dessert that’s moulded into the shapes of Christmas ornaments or fruits and flowers. It can be gluten free if almonds and cashewnuts are processed in a gluten free facility. 
Prep Time45 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Total Time45 mins
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: East Indian
Author: Abby

Ingredients

  • 500 grams Cashewnuts
  • 750 grams Sugar Powdered
  • 4 Egg Whites
  • 45 ml Rose Water For Grinding
  • 90 ml Rose Water To add while heating mixture.
  • 3 drops Almond Essense

Instructions

  • Sprinkle a thali or thala (flatboard) with powder sugar and keep aside.
  • Grind the cashewnuts to a paste with 45 ml rose water.
  • Put the cashewnut paste into a vessel along with the remaining rose water, ground sugar, almond essence and egg whites.
  • On a very low flame, stir till it reaches a wax like consistency. (Be careful not to burn the mixture. This will take 30 to 45 minutes depending on the heat.)
  • Once the mixture is quite dry, pour it into a thala aka thali and knead till easily pliable. Separate the mixture into 3 or 4 balls, add a few drops of colour to each ball, mould the colored balls and set aside.
  • Sprinkle the moulds with some powdered sugar.
  • Mould the marzipan into tiny balls and place into moulds till they form the required shapes. Or if you don’t have moulds, form into fruits shapes with hands. 
  • Place the ready pieces on the flatboard and leave out to dry overnight.

Notes

1. Can be stored at room temperature for a month.
2. To ensure that your marzipan is gluten free, purchase them from a gluten free processing facility.

Related : If you’re looking for the marzipan Easter Eggs recipe, click here!

Next time we’ll do the recipe for the almond marzipan. 😉 Which one do you prefer to make? Almond or cashewnut mass pav?

East Indian Marzipan or Mass Pav recipe - TheWingedFork

I’ve been getting emails asking if I take orders. We don’t do that anymore. So here is a list of East Indian sweet maker who do take orders. (In alphabetical order.)

Gwenette Fernandez
Cuncolim, Goa, India
+91- 9881946259

Maculate Rodgrigues
Bhyandar and Santacruz (Kalina), Mumbai, India
+91-9819632968

Pretty Baked
Vanessa Henriques
Borivili, Mumbai, India
+91 – 9920915812
henriques.vanessa@yahoo.com
Pretty Baked By Vanessa on Facebook

If you want to be added to this list, email me your details at abby@thewingedfork.com

Details I can include:
Name – Compulsory
Location – Compulsory
Phone Number – Compulsory
Email Address – If you have one
Facebook page link – If you have one
Website link – If you have one

This post may contain affiliate links. Click here to read the disclaimer.

Post Author: Abby

I'm a foodie and travel blogger, still making my way out of the daily 9-to-5, or 9-to-7 rather. But I make time to travel as often as possible. I've travelled across parts of Europe and Asia, and love writing about my experiences with people and cultures. And naturally, I love food, wine and travel, and have an endless bucket list of places to go to, and experiences I must blog about. My favorite things - nice rainy days, the smell of cakes in the oven, playing in the snow, glasses of wine and dark chocolate.

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