50+ Best Street Food in Europe

Food makes the world go round. Doesn’t it? Okay, maybe my world and that of my fellow foodie friends. We’ve found that some of the best street foods in the world are European dishes. If you’re planning a trip to Europe, here are some amazing European street foods and local foods that you must try. Make way for the list of the 50 plus best street food, food trucks and local foodie places in Europe!

50 + Must Eat Local and Street Food in Europe

Pizza in Rome

Pizza al taglio is baked on rectangular trays, cut into slices, and sold by weight - Pic by Laura from The Culinary Travel Guide
Pizza in Rome
Pic by Laura from The Culinary Travel Guide

There are two types of pizza in Rome – pizza tonda (round) sold in sit-down pizzerias, and pizza al taglio (by the slice), a popular street food invented in Rome. Pizza al taglio is baked on rectangular trays, cut into slices, and sold by weight. The simplest varieties are pizza bianca (olive oil and salt) and pizza rossa (olive oil and tomato sauce).

One of the best places to eat pizza al taglio is at the famous Pizzarium, Rome’s number one pizzeria. The owner, Gabriele Bonci, has been called everything from a Roman pizza god to the Michelangelo of pizza. He’s clearly a master of his craft and not the least bit afraid to push the boundaries when it comes to toppings – tripe, cod livers, caviar, foie gras, truffles, gorgonzola, peaches with chicory – there are over 80 daily variations. I like the simplest ones, like potato with rosemary, the best. The light, airy crust reminds me of focaccia and I love it!

By Laura from The Culinary Travel Guide. Catch up with Laura on Facebook at The Culinary Travel Guide

Burek Meat Pies in Croatia

A meat pie pastry, favourite snack of Croatia - Pic by Rob from 2 Travel Dads
Burek Meat Pies in Croatia
Pic by Rob from 2 Travel Dads

Before arriving in Croatia we weren’t sure what sort of unique foods we’d find. Very quickly, we came to find the Croatian burek: a meat pie type pastry available in nearly every bakery and food cart. Flakey crust doesn’t begin to describe the burek. It’s layers upon layers of paper thin dough, like phyllo dough, and the cooked meat, potatoes or onions layered within the layers. Seasoned perfectly every time we found burek, it became our favorite snack, and often meal in each Croatian town.

We’ve tried to recreate Croatian burek at home now, and just cannot duplicate the flavors or the soft crunch. I just means that we’ll need to head back to the Isle of Vis or spend a few more days in Dubrovnik to get our fill of burek.

By Rob from 2 Travel Dads. Catch up with Rob on Facebook at 2 Travel Dads

English Yorkshire Burrito in England

Delicious bread and savory filling, add some poatoes and sauce, then roll it tight and sear it in its wrapper - Pic by Rob from 2 Travel Dads
English Yorkshire Burrito in England
Pic by Rob from 2 Travel Dads

On a day exploring London I happened upon the English food I didn’t know I needed: the Yorkshire Burrito. Just off Soho Square near Chinatown in London you’ll find the Street Food Union, which is a collection of food trucks open for lunch Monday through Saturday. And one of these trucks serves up the Yorkshire Burrito.

If you’re not familiar with Yorkshire pudding, it’s a buttery bread bowl that gets loaded with roast beef or other fillings, much like a pot pie. Well, take that delicious bread and savory filling, add some potatoes and sauce, then roll it tight and sear it in its wrapper and you have street food gold. Even with limited time in London, the Yorkshire Burrito was so good I returned to the Street Food Union a second time to have another. So crazy tasty. I cannot wait to return and see what fun twist they’ve put on the Yorkshire burrito next time!

By Rob from 2 Travel Dads. Follow Rob on Twitter at 2 Travel Dads

Pintxos in San Sebastián, Spain

Pintxos are small portions, normally served on a stick or skewer - Pic by Amber from With Husband In Tow
Pintxos in San Sebastián, Spain
Pic by Amber from With Husband In Tow

Many travelers come to Spain and head straight to Madrid or Barcelona. But for true culinary travelers, the Basque Country in northern Spain is a true treat. It’s home to numerous Michelin Star restaurants and a unique, local food destination in San Sebastian. Although Spain is known for tapas, San Sebastian is known for pinchos, or pintxos in the local Basque language. Pintxos are small portions, normally served on a stick or skewer. There is a method to enjoying pintxos in San Sebastian. A San Sebastian pintxos tour is one of the best ways to learn about this local dining tradition, either on an organized tour or by bar hopping independently. It’s a lot of fun to try a few pintxos at a bar and then hop to the next bar. The goal is to visit several of them in one night. This is a different way of eating and is a must-visit destination in Europe for food lovers.

By Amber from With Husband In Tow. See Amber’s amazing pics on Instagram at With Husband In Tow

Best European street food to eat in different countries - TheWingedFork

French crepes in North Ireland

Twirl the batter on a flat slab, and then he added egg, sausage, bacon, some onions, tomatoes and mushrooms - Pic by Faith from XYU And Beyond
French crepes in North Ireland
Pic by Faith from XYU And Beyond

When I was in St. George’s Market in Belfast I came across a crepe booth and was intrigued. I mean after all French crepes in N. Ireland? I watched the fellow for a few minutes and learned as he chatted with other customers that he was the Irish Champion Crepe Maker and he was most definitely French.

I watched him expertly twirl the batter on a flat slab, and then he added egg, sausage, bacon, some onions, tomatoes and mushrooms and finally wrapped up this glorious crepe for the customer. At that point I knew I had to have one, so hubs and I ordered an Irish Breakfast crepe and a second one stuffed with strawberries and cream. Well I have to say this was the best €4 Euros I ever spent it was an absolute taste treat and even today I can still smell and taste the memory of that beautiful crepe.

By Faith from XYU And Beyond Catch up with Faith on Facebook at XYU and BEYOND

Poffertjes in Amsterdam

Mini Pancakes cooked using a special cast iron or copper poffertjes grill - Pic by Nat from Natpacker
Poffertjes in Amsterdam
Pic by Nat from Natpacker

Poffertjes are a traditional Dutch food. They are generally served as a sweet treat and resemble mini pancakes. Traditionally they are served with powdered sugar and butter, but sometimes they are also served with syrup. These treats were seen as a poor man’s dish until the start of the 19th century, when they became fashionable.

The batter is made from buck flour, due to a lack of wheat flour during the French Revolution. The story goes that they were invented by Monks who used them as a weekly communion. Once the batter is made they are cooked using a special cast iron or copper poffertjes grill.

I tried these at Cafe de Prin in Amsterdam and they are delicious. I had them with maple syrup and powdered sugar, they are very sweet and definitely a must have in Amsterdam. The light and fluffy pancakes are surprisingly filling and make a nice treat at any time of the day.

By Nat from Natpacker Follow Nat on Twitter at Natpacker

Currywurst in Germany

Germany has plenty of world famous foods; Schnitzel, pretzels, beer (hey, some people consider beer a food group in Germany!). However, there are numerous foods that somehow aren’t as well known around the world, but are must-haves when in Deutschland; one of them being the delectable Currywurst!

While you can order a currywurst at many German restaurants, the best ones I’ve had are always at a street vendor or fest. You’ll also find them at just about any Imbiss (“snack” shop) and gas station as a quick bite as well.

It is amazing that something so simple is so delicious. After all, it’s basically a glorified hotdog slathered in a special ketchup styled sauce with curry powder. It doesn’t sound all that unique and extravagant, but the flavors together make for the most amazing snack food or even meal. Typically paired with a pile of fries and sometimes a roll, it is a surprising German classic that you just can’t go wrong with!

By LeAnna from Well Traveled Nebraskan Follow LeAnna on Twitter at Travel Nebraska

Pastel De Nata

Eggy custard in flaky pastry and sprinkled with cinnamon - Pic by James from Travel Collecting
Pastel De Nata
Pic by James from Travel Collecting

Before I went to Portugal, I had watched a TV show about Lisbon, and it had heavily featured pastel de nata, or Portuguese custard tart, so I was already a little obsessed before I arrived. As soon as I cleared through immigration into Lisbon, I saw them on display at an airport café and immediately bought one. It was delicious. Eggy custard in flaky pastry and sprinkled with cinnamon. It was a little (intentionally) burnt on top, which adds a nice bitter flavor to offset the sweetness of the custard. Perfection. I had three the first day I was in Portugal, and many more! Many were even better than that first one I had in the airport as soon as I arrived, but I still grabbed one last one from the same cafe again on my way out of Lisbon.

By James from Travel Collecting Follow James on Pinterest at Travel Collecting

Gyro in Greece

Pita stuffed with slices of roasted meat or veggies, tomatoes, onions, lettuce, tzatziki sauce, and french fries - Pic by Jackie & Justin from Life Of Doing
Gyro in Greece
Pic by Jackie & Justin from Life Of Doing

If you’re visiting Greece, you have to try the gyro. It’s a type of wrap where you have a pita stuffed with slices of roasted meat (chicken, pork, lamb, or beef) or without meat for vegetarians, tomatoes, red onions, lettuce, tzatziki sauce, and french fries.

What is unique about the gyro is how it’s made. Gyro shops will have vertical rotisserie spits for the meats and will roast for hours in a circular motion. Once ordered, the cook shaves off the edges of the slow-cooked charred meat to place in the wrap.

With the delicious flavors from the meat and textures from the vegetables, you may crave gyros frequently during your trip. They are affordable starting at 2 Euro at local shops and portable for takeaway. You can also order these at restaurants too.

By Jackie & Justin from Life Of Doing See Jackie’s & Justin’s amazing pics on Instagram at Life Of Doing

Kürtőskalács (Chimney Cake) in Transylvania

Traditional homemade cake – By Cris from LooknWalk
Kürtőskalács (Chimney Cake) in Transylvania
Pic by Markolaci – Source Wikipedia CC BY SA 3.0

Kürtőskalács is a spit cake specific to Transylvania, Romania and Hungary. It started as a festive treat but now it’s part of everyday consumption.

If you visit any touristy town in Transylvania, you are bound to find tents set up with chimney cake ovens. Also, you’ll surely find these at any open-air festival and especially during the Christmas Markets.

The recipe of the traditional homemade cake became standardized at the beginning of the 20th century. The dough contains wheat flour, buttermilk, eggs, yeast, salt, and sugar. A twine of dough is wrapped around the length of the spit and then everything is rolled in sugar. It goes in the oven, making sure to allow for even baking. It’s done when it has a brownish-red color. Then it gets rolled in the coating of your choice. I always favored cinnamon but there are plenty others including grounded walnuts or even coconut flakes.

By Cris from LooknWalk. Catch up with Cris on Facebook at LooknWalk

Ice creams from Cremoso in Sardinia, Italy

One of the unmissable foods to try is gelato – By Claudia from My Adventures Across The World
Ice creams from Cremoso in Sardinia, Italy
Pic Source Cremoso

One of the perks of visiting Italy is enjoying all the amazing food. The choice is hard, in a country that prides itself with the freshest, most delicious dishes one may hope for. One of the unmissable foods to try is gelato – the real, made-fresh daily one. Despite what one may think, the best shops have a small selection of flavors and these won’t actually be on display for everyone to see – so stay away from the ice cream shops that scream color!!

If visiting Sardinia, Cremoso, in the city center of Cagliari in Vico Carlo Felice, 3/A (a tiny side street of the more famous Largo Carlo Felice) is a must. This small shop opens every day to serve the most decadent cones and sundaes. The selection of flavors is small (for the above mentioned reasons) but the toppings are amazing and fresh!

By Claudia from My Adventures Across The World. Follow Claudia on Twitter at Claudioula

Handmade Chocolates in Lviv

 A Paradise for chocolate - Pic by Patti from Luggage and Lipstick
Handmade Chocolates in Lviv
Pic by Patti from Luggage and Lipstick

Lviv has been a paradise for chocolate lovers as far back as the middle ages. Their process of producing chocolate remains essentially the same. Candy makers still produce high quality, hand-made chocolate from locally-sourced organic ingredients. To find the best chocolate shop, Lviv Handmade Chocolates, head to Old Town and keep an eye out for people with their faces pressed up against the window. They will allow customers to try a small sample of their sweets before purchasing. Patrons can also take a workshop to learn how to make their chocolates. The process involves cutting, dipping, and sprinkling the chocolates. The most difficult part is trying not to eat the ingredients!

By Patti from Luggage and Lipstick See Patti’s amazing pics on Instagram at Luggage and Lipstick

Sfincione in Palermo

Mouthwatering thick pizza with delicious toppings when it bakes - Pic by Whitney from GoFam Travel
Sfincione in Palermo
Pic by Whitney from GoFam Travel

Sicily has some of the best food in Europe, and there is no better place to sample some of the highlights than in Palermo. We took a fun street food tour in this city and tried many great things, but the best was the Sfincione. This mouthwatering thick pizza is topped with Sicilian tomatoes, onions, and grated caciocavallo cheese, and sometimes anchovies then seasoned with locally dried oregano (a staple in Sicily.) The name Sfincione means sponge, as the focaccia-like crust absorbs some of the delicious toppings when it bakes. This is a must try Sicilian street food!

By Whitney from GoFam Travel. Follow Whitney on Pinterest at Go Fam Travel

Simit in Istanbul

Somewhere between a bagel and a pretzel - Pic by Kate from Our Escape Clause
Simit in Istanbul
Pic by Kate from Our Escape Clause

Somewhere between a bagel and a pretzel, simit–and the simit carts that sell them on the street–are extremely popular in Istanbul. Wherever you go in the city, a simit cart is sure to follow. You’ll see locals and tourists alike lining up to purchase them, with some intending to eat them immediately and some buying an entire bagful to take home to their family.

Inexpensive and delicious, they make a great snack on their own… but the best way to eat them is undeniably as part of a Turkish breakfast spread, where simit can be dipped in any number of spreads, from honey to hazelnut butter to olive paste, and become even tastier for the combination.

Pic by Kate from Our Escape Clause Catch up with Kate on Facebook at Our Escape Clause

The Ulster Fry in Northern Ireland

Bacon, traditional pork sausages, mushrooms and fried eggs - Pic by Allan from It's Sometimes Sunny in Bangor
The Ulster Fry in Northern Ireland
Pic by Allan from It’s Sometimes Sunny in Bangor

Northern Irish Food is well known for being greasy and fatty, and a good example of this would be The Ulster Fry, which is the preferred breakfast for almost everyone living there. And while it is a bit like breakfast fries found elsewhere in the UK, with back bacon, traditional pork sausages, mushrooms and fried eggs. The Ulster Fry includes regional favourites such as soda bread which has been leavened with baking soda, and potato bread which has been mixed with potato. Then there is the rather delightful black pudding which blends pork fat, with oatmeal, onions, and pig’s blood. To bring the dish together there are also less traditional options of baked beans, brown HP sauce, and maybe some tomato to pretend it’s healthy. The Ulster Fry is often found as an “All Day Breakfast” and a good spot to find it in Belfast is at ‘Fed and Watered’ along the Laganside, and near the Big Fish.

By Allan from It’s Sometimes Sunny in Bangor. See Allan’s amazing pics on Instagram at It’s Sometimes Sunny in Bangor

Best Street Food in Europe that you must try - TheWingedFork

Best Street Food in Europe to eat - TheWingedFork

Labskaus in Hamburg

Northern Germany’s traditional dish - By Renata from Bye Myself
HamburgerLabskaus 2, Pic by GeoTrinityWikipedia CC BY-SA 3.0

It’s definitely not made to be street food – since it comes as a ladleful mush: Labskaus. Probably known only Northern Germany, in Hamburg, it’s the traditional dish. Like many national dishes around the world, it was pure scarcity and imagination – some thinking outside the pot, so to speak – that created a true tradition.

Labskaus was invented in the heyday of seafaring by some old sea dogs: After weeks and week on the high sea, there wasn’t much left in the galley.’I have an idea’, said the ship’s cook ‘I just throw everything in one pot and mash it – that way it will also be like a vacation for our teeth’. A word and a blow.

He searched the kitchen for some leftover food – they always had plenty of potatoes and some corned beef – ready, set, go – he threw everything in a big pot, mashed it, added some red beet for color. Oh look, there are some eggs, not that fresh anymore, but once fried, nobody will notice.

Garnished with a pickled herring and cucumber, it looked like something really….edible.

By Renata from Bye Myself Catch up with Renata on Facebook at Bye Myself

Cevapi in Mostar

It is seasoned mince kebabs in delicious warm flatbread with raw onions and red bell peppers - Pic by Ben from The Sabbatical Guide
Cevapi in Mostar
Pic by Ben from The Sabbatical Guide

Ćevapi is a fantastic local food that can be found all over the Balkan region of Europe. It is a simple dish, made of seasoned mince kebabs in delicious warm flatbread, often served with raw onions and ajar (an oil based condiment cooked up with red bell peppers). Please don’t think simple is a bad thing though, in this case it’s a wonderful thing! I ate Ćevapi (or ćevapčići) almost everyday on our road trip through Croatia and Bosnia Herzegovina, and wasn’t let down once. My favourite though was in a little sidesteet restaurant in Mostar, washed down with some Bosnian coffee. If you’re ever in the Balkan region make this is the first thing you try.

By Ben from The Sabbatical Guide See Ben’s amazing pics on Instagram at The Sabbatical Guide

Shopska Salad in Bulgaria

Shopska is a simple salad, with Bulgarian Cheese - Pic by Josie from Josie Wanders
Shopska Salad in Bulgaria
Pic by Josie from Josie Wanders

Shopska salad is found all through the Balkans, and each country claims it as their own. I ate it for the first time in Bulgaria, and it was so delicious I then ate it almost everyday for the rest of my trip throughout the area.

Shopska is such a simple salad, just tomato, cucumber, a little onion, a few olives and occasionally some capsicum (peppers), all smothered in delicious, grated Bulgarian cheese! It’s this white cheese that gives this basic salad it’s flavour.

Pair your Shopska Salad with a serve of kebapche (skewers of grilled meat) and a glass of local beer for a delicious, simple meal.

By Josie from Josie Wanders. Catch up with Josie on Facebook at Josie Wanders

Pizza Capricciosa in Naples

Tomato sauce, cured ham, artichokes, mushrooms, mozzarella cheese, basil and black olives - Pic by Danila from Travelling Dany
Pizza Capricciosa in Naples
Pic by Danila from Travelling Dany

If you’re planning to visit Naples in the South of Italy, you absolutely must try Neapolitan pizza. In Napoli pizza is different from any other one you might’ve tried before: thin, pliable and with a 1 inch thick outer crust, full of bubbles. It only takes less than 1 minute to cook this treat in a wood-fired oven! There are hundreds of toppings but the most famous one is “Pizza Margherita”, with tomato sauce, olive oil, mozzarella cheese and fresh basil. Another local favorite is “Pizza Capricciosa”, with tomato sauce, cured ham, artichokes, mushrooms, mozzarella cheese, basil and black olives.

On average you can find a good pizza margherita to go in Naples Centro Storico for even 1.50€: a good start to a foodie trip to Napoli!

By Danila from Travelling Dany. Catch up with Danila on Facebook at Travelling Dany

Goulash in Prague - Pic by Mayuri from Tosomeplacenew
Goulash in Prague
Pic by Mayuri from TosSomePlaceNew

Goulash (beef stew/soup) in Prague

Prague is one of the classic and beautiful cities in Central Europe. One of the must eat local delicacy in Prague is beef stew called goulash. Made out of beef or any meat, it is seasoned to perfection with paprika and other spices. Although goulash originated during the medieval Hungarian times, it soon spread to other regions of Europe.

The goulash in Prague is thicker in soup base then its originators. It is also served with potato dumplings (as shown in the picture). It is a common restaurant menu item in Czech Republic and is also budget friendly. So, when you are in Prague next, try this out!

By Mayuri from ToSomePlaceNew. See Mayuri’s amazing photos on Instagram at To Some Place New

Pretzels from Salzburg By Mayuri from ToSomePlaceNew
Pretzels from Salzburg
By Mayuri from ToSomePlaceNew

Pretzels (3 euros pretzels in old town) in Salzburg

Salzburg (in Austria) is not only popular as Mozart’s birthplace, it is also well-known for some of its great cuisines. Popular food items include sachertorte, schnitzel, ‘Furst’ chocolate, etc.

In the old town of Salzburg, you will find food stalls selling home-made pretzels. These huge pretzels are a delight and exclusively sold near the Residentplatz and the Salzburg Cathedral. They cost 3 euros and are very filling. My favorite pretzel was cheese and jalapeno. It is definitely a must try when you are out and about exploring the birth place of Mozart!

By Mayuri from To Some Place New. Follow Mayuri on Pinterest at To Some Place New

Local food and street food in Europe that you must eat - TheWingedFork

Tiroler Grostl in Tirol, Austria

Fried onion, bacon and other small meat pieces are added to sauteed potatoes and topped with fried egg - Pic by Eniko from Travel Hacker Girl
Tiroler Grostl in Tirol, Austria
Pic by Eniko from Travel Hacker Girl

If you are in Austria on a ski holiday I highly recommend trying Tiroler Grostl. It became my favourite dish on our ski trip. Tiroler Grostl is Tirol’s most typical dish, but you can find it all over the country. Fried onion, bacon and other small meat pieces are added to sauteed potatoes and it is topped with a fried egg in the end. It is a filling meal after burning off so many calories while skiing all day. It typically cost €12.00-15.00 on the ski slopes. If you want to save some money, you can prepare it yourself. It is an easy meal to prepare at home from some leftovers.

By Eniko from Travel Hacker Girl. See Eniko’s amazing pics on Instagram at Travel Hacker Girl

Blue Fish on Vis Island in Croatia

Sardine sized Blue Fish are a local favourite - Pic by Jan from Budget Travel Talk
Blue Fish on Vis Island in Croatia
Pic by Jan from Budget Travel Talk

Croatia is famous for it’s islands and beaches, so it is no surprise that seafood plays a big role in the local food scene.

Vis Island, the furthest flung of all the Croatian Islands, has a proud history of fishing and sardine sized Blue Fish are a local favourite.

Our Airbnb host returned from the harbour with some freshly caught fish, lit a fire of quickly prepared olive branches and placed the grill over the coals.

The fish marinated in home grown olive oil, only take a few minutes to cook and the taste, enhanced by olive smoke is both subtle and delicious.

This rustic dish surprised with it’s delicate flavour and if I lived on Vis Island, grilled blue fish would be on my plate at every opportunity, served up with a glass of home-made white wine of course.

By Jan from Budget Travel Talk. Follow Jan on Pinterest at BudgetJan

White Asparagus in Bavaria, Germany

German White Gold, this delicious vegetable is almost a cult figure in Germany - Pic by Soumya from Stories By Soumya
White Asparagus in Bavaria
Pic by Soumya from Stories By Soumya

If you are looking to try some authentic German food, try something with the white asparagus in it. Often referred to as the German White Gold, this delicious vegetable is almost a cult figure in Germany.

Germans love their white asparagus with butter and ham. And there is a season when they eat it at least once a day if not more. The Asparagus Season or “Spargelzeit” begins in April and runs all the way till the 24th of June. German love for the pale vegetable is unbeatable which is why they even have asparagus-themed gourmet trails and festivals. They have asparagus queens too!

In Bavaria, you will find the European Asparagus Museum in a small town called Schrobenhausen. The collection pays homage to all things related to the asparagus including conservation, medical usage, and art. Here, you will also find a painting of the royal vegetable by Andy Warhol! Now that would be some amazing local food to try in Europe

By Soumya from Stories By Soumya. See Soumya’s amazing pics on Instagram at Stories By Soumya

Crepes in Brittany

In Brittany, they make crepes with buckwheat flour and less milk - Pic by Eloise from My Favourite Escapes
Crepes in Brittany
Pic by Eloise from My Favourite Escapes

You’ve probably heard about crepes. But have you heard about the ones they make in Brittany? The most western part of France is famous for using anything as crepe filings. It can be sweet, of course, or savoury. They don’t use the same flour than the regular crepes you’ll find in the rest of France. In Brittany, they make crepes with buckwheat flour and less milk. And they call them “Galette”. You can find restaurants serving them everywhere in the region. Look for a “Creperie”. Not only is it delicious, but it’s also rather cheap. I love how you can get creative about what you put inside and tailor it to your favourite tastes. The most common one is “La Complete”: ham, cheese and egg. If you want to try a local product, order a galette with “andouille”, a smoked pork sausage. As a street food, you can get a “galette-saucisse” at some outdoor markets or sporting events. It’s simply a sausage rolled into a crepe, with no sauce or additional toppings. For the desert, the crepe with homemade caramel and salted butter is one of the best things in Brittany!

By Eloise from My Favourite Escapes. Follow Eloise on Twitter at Miieloise

Arancine in Palermo

The rice mixture is usually flavoured with saffron, giving it a golden glow - Pic by Steph from The Mediterranean Traveller
Arancine in Palermo
Pic by Steph from The Mediterranean Traveller

The Sicilian capital of Palermo is well-known amongst locals as a foodie hotspot, but less so outside Italy. It’s got three buzzing outdoors markets which have long been associated with street food.

Historically, the city’s street dishes emerged as a cheap and filling way to feed its growing number of workers, particularly around the port area. Probably the most enticing of Palermo’s savoury snacks (many are offal-based) is its arancine – rice balls that have been stuffed and deep fried.

There’s a long-running battle between Palermo and Sicily’s second city, Catania, on the other side of the island, for who makes (and spells) arancine the right way.

In Palermo the balls are round, and they spell it arancine (feminine). In Catania they’re cone-shaped, slightly pointy at one end and spelt arancini (masculine). Either way, they’re delicious.

The rice mixture is usually flavoured with saffron, giving it a golden glow. Perhaps this explains the name (which is similar to the Italian word for little oranges). It’s then shaped into balls, filled with tasty morsels, covered with breadcrumbs and deep-fried.

Most of the arancine I came across in Palermo were whopping great big things, not the dainty golf-ball sized versions you see in other countries. I like the hot meaty version filled with ragu and peas best, but mozzarella is another popular filling.

You’ll find arancine in plenty of convenience chains around the city and beyond, but it’s worth seeking out hot freshly fried balls – check the stalls around the markets or join a street food tour to find the best ones.

By Steph from The Mediterranean Traveller. Catch up with Steph on Facebook at The Mediterranean Traveller

Gözleme in Turkey

Spiced cooked potato, a spinach/feta mix or minced meat and onions are great choices - Pic by Jan from Budget Travel Talk
Gözleme in Turkey
Pic by Jan from Budget Travel Talk

When I think of Turkey, I think of the meeting of Europe and Asia, the exotic call to prayer, exquisite Mediterranean Blue and Gözleme.

This simple, savoury street food is served all over Turkey and is my go to option for a cheap tasty lunch or breakfast. It is healthy comfort food and fast food all rolled into one.
Traditional fillings like spiced cooked potato, a spinach/feta mix or minced meat and onions are great choices.

Best described as a savoury pastry or pancake, the dough – a mix of flour, salt and water – is rolled with a small diameter “Oklava” rolling pin until it is super thin. It is then cooked on a hot metal grill before being folded in half to form a pocket or göz for your choice of filling and cooked some more.

The trick to a good Gözleme I think, is to keep the filling minimal. The versions I’ve tried at home in Australia tend to be over generous with the filling.

The pancake is then removed from the griddle, deftly sliced into manageable pieces and served alongside the best tomatoes in the world and those long green (but not hot) chillies that the Turks consider essential.

Sometimes the chillies are charred on the grill, which makes them even better. Simple, filling and addictive.

By Jan from Budget Travel Talk. Follow Jan on Pinterest at Budget Travel Talk

Sirniki in Russia

Sirniki are made of fresh cottage cheese that is mixed with a little bit of semolina, sour cream, and sugar - Pic by Yulia from That's What She Had
Sirniki in Russia
Pic by Yulia from That’s What She Had

The word “sirniki” might sound weird, but I swear it’s the best breakfast in the entire world that will spoil you for life. In Russia, where this dish takes its roots, sirniki can be both a breakfast and a dessert. Sirniki are made of fresh cottage cheese that is mixed with a little bit of flour (often semolina flour), sour cream, and sugar. The resulting dough-like mixture is used to shape patties and fry them on a pan. The patties can be served with sour cream, jam, or honey (or everything at once!) and make the most satisfying morning meal. Add a cup of coffee to your order and thank me later. In Moscow, you can try sirniki at Stolovaya №57. And if you are in Saint Petersburg, try it at cafe Mechtateli (which translates to “Dreamers”).

By Yulia from That’s What She Had. Catch up with Yulia on Facebook at That’s What She Had

Best Street Food in Europe that you cannot miss - TheWingedFork

Trdelnik with ice cream in Prague

Trdelnik, the local street delicacy in Czech Republic - Pic by Marianna from Irma Naan World
Trdelnik with ice cream in Prague
Pic by Marianna from Irma Naan World

I love ice cream and I love pastry and in Prague I found a way to combine them. Trdelnik, the local street delicacy here in Czech Republic, is dough wrapped around sticks and, ideally, baked over open fire, but I saw vendors using electric ovens as well. When the pastry is hot from the oven, it is rolled in sugar and nut mix. And then this goodness is topped with delicious vanilla ice cream!

Don’t like ice cream? No problem, you can get just the cone, or have it with chocolate, or whipped cream, or berries.

When you buy one, make sure that the trdelnik you get is fresh. It is hard to believe it, especially seeing those crowds that stroll along the streets of Prague, but vendors do not manage to sell all trdelniks they bake, so you might get a stale one. It happened to me, and the taste was definitely spoiled

By Marianna from Irma Naan World. See Marianna’s amazing pics on Instagram at Irma Naan World

Poffert from Groningen, Netherlands

The most common poffert is made with dried raisins or currants - Pic by Michelle from Greedy Gourmet
Poffert from Groningen, Netherlands
Pic by Michelle from Greedy Gourmet

Poffert from Groningen is a definite must try when it comes to trying the best local or street food in Europe. I discovered poffert during my travels through Groningen, the Netherlands. It is a sort of cake, which is made out of buckwheat flour, wheat flour, milk, eggs, yeast and your favourite dried fruits. Traditionally speaking, the most common poffert is made with dried raisins or currants. However, when you visit Groningen, you’ll see that there are many versions of it with different types of fruit and nuts. In my opinion, poffert is best enjoyed with a cup of tea or coffee. Although the batter is cooked with a very special au bain marie tin, it is actually very simple to make. Enjoy discovering the taste of Groningen!

By Michelle from Greedy Gourmet. Catch up with Michelle on Facebook at Greedy Gourmet

Croissants in Paris

There is nothing more perfectly French than a buttery flaky croissant - Pic by Katy from Untold Morsel
Croissants in Paris
Pic by Katy from Untold Morsel

There is nothing more perfectly French than a buttery flaky croissant. The iconic crescent shaped pastries are a must try dish in Paris. Actually they are a must try several times because you should try and find the one you like best. Start your croissant journey at one of the branches of Maison Landemain. They are renowned for the quality of their croissants. But which one will you choose? A classic croissant au beurre (plain butter croissant) or a pain au chocolate (chocolate croissant)? It’s a tough decision.

By Katy from Untold Morsel. Catch up with Katy on Facebook at Untold Morsel

Cacio e pepe in Rome

Cacio e pepe is a simple rustic dish full of flavour and has only a handful of ingredients - Pic by Katy from Untold Morsel
Cacio e pepe in Rome
Pic by Katy from Untold Morsel

When in Rome you must try one of the city’s famous and ancient pasta dishes. Cacio e pepe is a simple rustic dish full of flavour and has only a handful of ingredients. Cacio e pepe is made with grated pecorino romano cheese (cacio in Roman dialect), peppercorns and the water that the pasta is cooked in. This delicious sauce is added to tonarelli – a thick, square-shaped long noodle – perfect for slurping up the sauce. It is how the ingredients are combined that make this dish so special. The cheese needs to be at room temperature and the water not too hot so they combine smoothly and there are no clumps.

You can try a delicious cacio e pepe at Flavio al Velavevodetto [Via di Monte Testaccio, 97, Rome]. Their version of cacio e pepe was one of my favourite meals in Rome.

By Katy from Untold Morsel. Catch up with Katy on Facebook at Untold Morsel

Smorrebrod in Copenhagen

An open-faced sandwich, topped with Danish cheese, roast beef, or pork roast - Pic by Jacky from Nomad Epicureans
Smorrebrod in Copenhagen
Pic by Jacky from Nomad Epicureans

One of the most iconic foods you have to try in Denmark is the traditional smorrebrod. Smorrebrod is essentially an open-faced sandwich, usually consisting of rye bread and various toppings. Toppings can include things such as herring, Danish cheese, roast beef, or pork roast. What once started out as a meal for Danish farmers in the past, is a popular lunch snack among Danes today. Prices and quality of smorrebrod can vary as you can find it in both supermarkets, as well as traditional Danish restaurants. To try it in Copenhagen, head to Restaurant Kronborg in the city center or (like most locals) to Rita’s Smorrebrod in the district of Norrebro. Vegetarian options are also available, including cheese, potato, or egg toppings.

By Jacky from Nomad Epicureans. Catch up with Jacky on Facebook at Nomad Epicureans

Smoked Omul in Lake Baikal in Russia

The best way to find and eat your omul is to wander the streets of Listvyanka - Pic by Sarah from A Social Nomad
Smoked Omul in Lake Baikal in Russia
Pic by Sarah from A Social Nomad

Omul is a small white fish from the salmon family that is endemic to Lake Baikal in Russia. Baikal is generally known as the deepest lake in Europe and visited by those generally on a through trip on the Trans Siberian Train or taking the Circum Baikal Railway. The closest city is Irkutsk, although you’ll need to venture to Listvyanka to get yourself some omul. Omul is one of the primary foodstuffs of those living around the lake, yet its considered a delicacy throughout Russia.

We’d never heard of it until we arrived in Listvyanka in the pouring rain. The best way to find and eat your omul is to wander the streets of Listvyanka (it won’t take you long) and spot the fish smoking containers at the ends of gardens. If you’re lucky a babushka will rush away from what she’s doing and sell you a few. You can of course also go to the market stalls in the centre of town, but where’s the fun in that? You’ll want more than you think. This small fish is Moorish and superb for snacking on. It’s salty, smoky and yet sweet too.

You’re unlikely to find this anywhere else on your travels and eating right next to the source is definitely the way to try it. Find yourself a piece of rocky beach on the shores of Lake Baikal, and enjoy!

By Sarah from A Social Nomad. Catch up with Sarah on Facebook at A Social Nomad 

Hobz biz zejt in Malta

Hobz biz zejt, are made using ingredients that are easily accessible in the dry Maltese climate - Pic by Bianca from The Altruistic Traveller
Hobz biz zejt in Malta
Pic by Bianca from The Altruistic Traveller

Hobz biz zejt literally translates to ‘bread containing oil’, but there is so much more to this famous Maltese Mediterranean dish. Often containing simple ingredients such as tomato paste, tuna, olive oil, capers and olives this mouth-watering sourdough bread roll is a cheap, filling lunch for the Maltese. Many Maltese dishes, like hobz biz zejt, are made using ingredients that are easily accessible in the dry Maltese climate. The food also has a historical influence. During the first and second world wars, the Maltese had little access to food variety so many of the dishes consist of locally grown ingredients like tomatoes, olives and olive oil. You can order a hobz biz zejt for as little as 2 Euros and wash it down with a bottle of the famous Maltese soft drink, Kinnie.

By Bianca from The Altruistic Traveller. See Bianca’s amazing pics on Instagram at The Altruistic Traveller

Creamy garlic soup in Slovakia

Creamy garlic soup that is traditionally served in a giant crusty bread roll - Pic by Alex from Career Gappers
Creamy garlic soup in Slovakia
Pic by Alex from Career Gappers

The national cuisine of Slovakia is hearty and wholesome, reflective of the country’s rural farming origins. Soup is an essential element of Slovak culinary culture. While it comes in many varieties throughout the country, my favourite example is the classic krémová cesnaková polievka, creamy garlic soup that is traditionally served in a giant crusty bread roll.

When the cold weather bites during the Central European winter, there’s no better dish to warm you up, and it’s so filling you probably won’t need a main dish afterwards. Sometimes it is served with sheep’s cheese, other times croutons – but always satisfying.

On the outskirts of Bratislava’s Old Town stands Meštiansky Pivovar, the oldest brewery in Slovakia, which also happens to serve delicious Slovak dishes. Its creamy garlic soup was the best we tried; tangy and full of flavour. If you don’t have the appetite for all that bread though, don’t worry – you can usually order it in a simple bowl.

By Alex from Career Gappers. Follow Alex on Pinterest at Career Gappers

Amazing Street Food in Europe that you must taste - TheWingedFork

Kroketten in The Netherlands

A kroket, or croquette in English, is usually made from a mixture of beef or veal and ragout - By Manon from Visiting The Dutch Countryside
Kroketten in The Netherlands
Pic sourced from Pixabay CC

One of the things I love the most about traveling is getting to know the local food culture of a country or region. The Netherlands might be a small country, but we have plenty of tasty food that you should try out.

One of the local foods you have to try in The Netherlands is the kroket. As a Dutch, born and raised citizen, I cannot even remember when I first had the kroket. A kroket, or croquette in English, is usually made from a mixture of beef or veal and ragout.

It is a fried snack that is mainly sold at snack bars, such as FEBO, but also at typical Dutch cafes as a lunch combined with bread. Nowadays there is a vegetarian version of the kroket available as well.

Yearly, we eat more than 300 million kroketten a year. So, trying a kroket when you’re traveling in The Netherlands is a must, as it’s part of the Dutch identity. Trust me when I say, don’t leave The Netherlands without trying a kroket. You won’t regret it.

By Manon from Visiting The Dutch Countryside. Follow Manon on Pinterest at Visiting The Dutch Countryside

Haggis, Neeps and Tatties in Scotland

This traditional Scottish dish is been served since 18th century - Pic by Gillian from Scotland Bucket List
Haggis, Neeps and Tatties in Scotland
Pic by Gillian from Scotland Bucket List

If you’re visiting Scotland, there’s a good chance you’ll come across ‘haggis, neeps and tatties’ on a menu. We recently had a delicious serving of this traditional Scottish dish in the 18th century Drovers Inn near Loch Lomond and recommend that you add it to your Scottish bucket list of things to try!

So what exactly is this dish? Let’s start with ‘haggis’… some unsuspecting tourists are tricked into believing that it’s a small animal that roams wild in the Scottish highlands – it’s not! It’s a type of savoury pudding composed of various parts of a sheep (I won’t go into detail!), oatmeal, suet and seasoning wrapped into a sheep’s stomach and boiled. It tastes delicious, honest! Neeps are mashed swede and tatties are the Scottish word for ‘potatoes’ and they’re usually mashed. This dish is traditionally eaten on Burns night (25th January) to commemorate Robert Burns, the famous Scots poet.

By Gillian from Scotland Bucket List. Catch up with Gillian on Facebook at Scotland Bucket List

Fava in Greece

Fava beans are pureed with olive oil before you add parsley and lemon, making it a dip or spread of split peas - Pic by Nathan from Foodie Flashpacker
Fava in Greece
Pic by Nathan from Foodie Flashpacker

Although fava is one of the simplest traditional Greek dishes it’s one of my favorites. Fava beans are pureed with really good olive oil (this is key) before you add parsley and lemon, essentially making it a dip or spread of split peas. It reminds me of a Greek hummus.

Nearly every Greek restaurant has it on the menu and for me no meal in Greece is complete without it being offered as a starter.

You can also have fava as part of your main dish when it’s served with some sort of meat. My favorite is to order it with grilled octopus!

When you’re in Greece, or at a Greek restaurant, be sure to try fava- you won’t regret it!

By Nathan from Foodie Flashpacker. See Nathan’s amazing pics on Instagram at Foodie Flashpacker

Lángos in Budapest

Deep-fried dough, which is then covered in sour cream and shredded cheese - Pic by Allison from Eternal Arrival
Lángos in Budapest
Pic by Allison from Eternal Arrival

Hungry? You won’t want to miss lángos in Hungary! One of the best local foods that you can’t leave Budapest without trying is lángos. This traditional street snack is delicious but boy is it unhealthy! It’s made of deep-fried dough, which is then covered in sour cream and shredded cheese. This is the most classic variation, but of course, it is common to add other toppings such as ham, sausage, veggies, or even sweet toppings like jam or powdered sugar. It’s common year-round but it is particularly satisfying in the cold Budapest winters. Be sure to include sampling a lángos on your Budapest itinerary!

By Allison from Eternal Arrival. See Allison’s amazing pics on Instagram at Eternal Arrival

Banitsa in Bulgaria

Filling is blend of Bulgarian yogurt, whisked egg, and salty Bulgarian feta-like cheese called sirene - Pic by Allison from Sofia Adventures
Banitsa in Bulgaria
Pic by Allison from Sofia Adventures

If there is one food that is most emblematic of Bulgaria, it’s the beloved breakfast pastry, banitsa. Banitsa is a pastry similar to börek (a pastry found throughout all the Balkan cuisines with a Bulgarian twist. Namely, banitsa is different for its shape (a round coil) and its filling (a blend of Bulgarian yogurt, whisked egg, and salty Bulgarian feta-like cheese called sirene). These toppings are mixed together and then stuffed between layers of filo dough before being baked to salty, cheesy perfection. Occasionally banitsa will be stuffed with sweet fillings like pumpkin, but the classic egg-yogurt-cheese is the most traditional. And at about one leva per slice (about 50 euro cents) you can definitely afford to indulge in a banitsa or two while in Bulgaria!

By Allison from Sofia Adventures. See Allison’s amazing pics on Instagram at Sofia Adventures

Tiramisu in Rome

Bit of alcohol with coffee, finger biscuits, and mascarpone cheese - Pic by Andra from Our World To Wander
Tiramisu in Rome
Pic by Andra from Our World To Wander

You cannot possibly visit Italy without tasting its delicious tiramisu. The famous desert which combines a bit of alcohol with coffee, finger biscuits, and mascarpone cheese. The result is a yummy flavour that will make you want to eat not one, but tons of tiramisu. One of the best places to try tiramisu in Italy is in Rome, at the tiny place called Two Sizes, next to Piazza Navona. Not only will you find some incredible tiramisu there, but you can also spoil your buds with some Italian gelato and the staple Sicilian desert, cannoli. Believe it or not, the name tiramisu means pick me up. So next time you are in Roma, let the tiramisu pick you up.

By Andra from Our World To Wander. Catch up with Andra on Facebook at Our World To Wander

Cannoli in Sicily

Crispy shells stuffed with various sweet ingrediants from many places around the island - Pic by Laura from The Travelling Stomach
Cannoli in Sicily
Pic by Laura from The Travelling Stomach

Sicily is famed for its street food delights and perhaps one of the most well-known exports is the Cannoli. Famous across the world, you can tuck into these wonderful crispy shells stuffed with various sweet ingrediants from many places around the island, but particularly in Palermo. A favourite version is with whipped ricotta and cheeky chocolate chips, which you will be able to pick up from various cafes and street stalls. Be warned though, the vendors there are not known for the bite sized treats you might have experienced elsewhere, be prepared for a jumbo version of this beloved Italian dessert!

By Laura from The Travelling Stomach. Catch up with Laura on Facebook at The Travelling Stomach

50+ Street Food in Europe that you must taste - TheWingedFork

Icelandic Hot Dog in Reykjavik

Combination of pork, beef, & lamb cased weiner in a steamed bun - Pic by Constance in The Adventures of Panda Bear
Icelandic Hot Dog in Reykjavik
Pic by Constance in The Adventures of Panda Bear

Icelandic hot dogs are a fun breed of hot dog. They’re made up of a combination of pork, beef, & lamb cased weiner in a steamed bun and topped with ketchup, sweet mustard, remoulade, crispy fried onions, and diced raw onions. Locals love them too and they’ll recommend you get them with onions, even if you hate them. I’m not the hugest fan of onions and I loved my hot dog with all of the fixings!

Since the hot dogs are made with a combination of meats, they also have a more unique flavor. The lamb lends it some gamey flavor and the pork and beef provide it with more fat and deliciousness. One of the most famous spots to try this is Baejarins Beztu Pylsur in downtown Reykjavik.

By Constance from The Adventures of Panda Bear. See Constance’s amazing pics on Instagram at The Adventures of Panda Bear

Oliebollen in the Netherlands

Ice cream scoop put the dough into a deep fryer with hot oil - By Manon from Visiting The Dutch Countryside
Oliebollen in the Netherlands
Pic sourced from Pixabay CC

When you’re traveling to The Netherlands, an oliebol is one of the things you have to eat. Oliebollen (oil balls is the literal translation) are a traditional Dutch food and mostly eaten at funfairs and on New Year’s Eve. But you will also see a lot of oliebol stalls during winter, where they will sell them on random streets. However, in my opinion, you should eat them whenever you have the chance.

Oliebollen are made by using a spoon or ice cream scoop put the dough into a deep fryer with hot oil. Once the dough enters the hot oil, the typical oliebol shape will appear. The dough of oliebollen is made from flour, eggs, yeast, milk, baking powder and salt. Sometimes, depending on which oliebol you take, they can be filled with raisins. We usually eat oliebollen with powdered sugar. So, it’s not the healthiest Dutch snack, however, it is one of the tastiest. You should not leave The Netherlands without trying one of these bad boys.

By Manon from Visiting The Dutch Countryside See Manon’s amazing pics on Instagram at Visiting The Dutch Countryside

Tapas in Catalonia

Highly encourage everyone to try some Tapas when you visit Catalonia - Pic by Vicki from Vicki Viaja
Tapas in Catalonia
Pic by Vicki from Vicki Viaja

While in the Basque Country Pintxos are the more popular option, in Catalonia (and the rest of Spain) we love our tapas. Tapas are basically just little dishes that you can share with the people you eat with. They are perfect either as just a little snack or as a whole meal as you can order as many as you like. Some of the most popular options in the Catalonia region are Patatas Bravas, Tortilla de Patata, and Bombas which are deep fried potato balls filled with meat. My mouth waters just thinking about them and I highly encourage everyone to try some Tapas when you visit Catalonia.

Often when you go to a restaurant you also get a typical Catalan side dish that is called Pa Amb Tomaquet which is basically just bread with tomato, garlic, and oil.

By Vicki from Vicki Viaja. See Vicki’s amazing pics on Instagram at Vicki Viaja

Zapiekanka in Poland

The open-faced sandwich is basically a grilled baguette with mushrooms, onions and cheese - By Abbie from Speck On The Globe
Zapiekanka in Poland
Pic by Mariuszjbie, Zapiekanka, from Wikipedia CC BY-SA 4.0

The best local street food I found in Poland is a mouthful, Zapiekanka. The open-faced sandwich is basically a grilled baguette with mushrooms, onions and cheese then toasted to melt. It’s then traditionally topped with a hot ketchup, but the great part about these cheap eats is that there are many places where you can come up with your own delicious creation. You can find Zapiekanka in just about any town square but the most popular place is in Kazimierz, the historic Jewish district in Krakow. Plac Nowy, the “new” square has dozens of food stalls to choose from.

By Abbie from Speck On The Globe. Catch up with Abbie on Facebook at Speck On The Globe

Börek in Turkey

Flakey phyllo dough surrounding Turkish cheese - Pic by Angelica from Things to do & Eat
Börek in Turkey
Pic by Angelica from Things to do & Eat

Börek is a classic Turkish pastry that you need to try when in Europe, even if you think you don’t like savory pastries. Börek might change your mind!

Picture flakey phyllo dough surrounding Turkish cheese and sometimes additional fillings like spinach or meat. Different regions in Turkey and even surrounding countries have their own version, and you can find it not just as a street food but also at cafes and restaurant at throughout the day.

For more on what to check out and eat after börek, check out my one day in Istanbul guide.

By Angelica from Things to do & Eat. Catch up with Angelica on Facebook at Things to do & Eat

Kolbice in Budapest

Wheat bread cone is filled with small sausages, sauerkraut, onions, and cheese sauce - Pic by Ruth from Tanama Tales
Kolbice in Budapest
Pic by Ruth from Tanama Tales

While in Budapest, we found ourselves strolling the stalls of a street food market in the Jewish Quarter. The options were varied but a peculiar stall caught my husband’s eye. He was eager to try a kolbice. Never hear about this dish? Well, let me explain what it is.

A whole wheat bread cone is filled with small sausages, sauerkraut, onions, and cheese sauce. At the place we visited, there was an option to choose six or eight sausages. My husband ordered one with six sausages (two duck, two pork, two beef). More traditional versions include eight sausages, four Bavarian and four Hungarian.
I wasn’t sold on the concept when I saw it for the first time, but I was hooked the minute I tried it. The kolbice was delicious! Find this street food staple on food markets, stalls in plazas, specialized fast food restaurants, and subway stations

By Ruth from Tanama Tales. Follow Ruth on Pinterest at Tanama Tales

Pastizzi in Malta

Bakes delicious pastizzi in a traditional wood fired oven - Pic by Maggie from The World Was Here First
Pastizzi in Malta
Pic by Maggie from The World Was Here First

Malta is slowly gaining attention as a great place to visit in Mediterranean Europe, with this small island nation boasting a brilliant blue coastline, a fascinating ancient history, and friendly locals who are proud of the small country they call home. One thing that Malta does not get enough attention for, however, is its fantastic cuisine.

While there are numerous local dishes worth trying when embarking on a trip to Malta, there are few things that will have as much prevalence as pastizzi. Small, filo pastries, pastizzi are the favourite snack amongst Maltese locals and tourists alike. Available at bakeries all over the nation, pastizzi are filled with a variety of foods, the most common of which are a salty ricotta-like cheese and mushy peas (a reminder of the days when Malta was under British colonial rule).

While you can get pastizzi virtually anywhere that sells baked goods on Malta and Gozo, arguably the best place to eat them is at the Crystal Palace in the town of Rabat on the main island of Malta. This place is open 24 hours per day and bakes delicious pastizzi in a traditional wood fired oven, all for under €1 per pastry.

By Maggie from The World Was Here First. Catch up with Maggie on Facebook at The World Was Here First

Trdelník in Czech Republic

Trdelník is very delicious sweet pastry - Pic by Šárka from Plzen Guide
Trdelník in Czech Republic
Pic by Šárka from Plzen Guide

Trdelník is very delicious sweet pastry which probably doesn´t have its origin in Czech Republic, but you can buy it on all traditional markets around the Country.

Trdelnik is sometimes called “chimney cakes” due to its unique shape.

It is nice experience to watch the preparation: the dough is wrapped around the roller, covered by sugar, cinnamon and milled nuts and backed in the oven in front of your eyes. At the end it is powdered with vanilla sugar. You can eat it hot which warm up your belly when it is cold outside.

Pic by Šárka from Plzen Guide. Catch up with Šárka on Facebook at Plzen Guide

Kibbeling in The Netherlands

Kibbeling - small and salty battered chunks of white fish - Pic by Bren from Bren on the Road
Kibbeling in The Netherlands
Pic by Bren from Bren on the Road

Around the Netherlands you’re going to find many little food trucks (and restaurants too) that serve kibbeling – small and salty battered chunks of white fish. The batter is not as heavy as what you’ll find on, say, British fish and chips, but the pieces are still deep fried until crispy and fragrant. They are almost always served with a garlic mayonnaise, and people often enjoy eating them with fries too. It’s very popular in the Netherlands and the perfect in-between snack on those cold Dutch winter days!!

By Bren from Bren on the Road. See Bren’s amazing pics on Instagram at Bren on the Road

Doner in Germany

Best place to get it is Mustafa's in Berlin - Pic by Lindsay from I’ve Been Bit
Doner in Germany
Pic by Lindsay from I’ve Been Bit

When you think of German food, naturally your mind drifts to schnitzel, bratwurst, sauerkraut – the iconic eats. It wasn’t until I returned to Germany with my partner that my mouth was opened to the world of döner. You may recognize it as it originated in Turkey, however I have to say the Germans truly make this dish complete. I’ve had a number of them as I insist on eating döner in every new city I visit, but hands down the best place to get it is Mustafa’s in Berlin. While you may be waiting 30-45 minutes in line to indulge, I swear it’s worth it. The best part? They’re only €3,50 a piece… so go ahead and order two. Your tastebuds will thank you!

By Lindsay from I’ve Been Bit. Catch up with Lindsay on Facebook at I’ve Been Bit

Langos in Slovakia

Langoše with ketchup and cheese at the Spiš Annual Fair in Slovakia - Pic by Peter from I Heart Slovakia
Langoše with ketchup and cheese at the Spiš Annual Fair in Slovakia
Pic by Peter from I Heart Slovakia

Langoš is Central Europe’s answer to pizza. The snack has origins in Hungary but it’s also popular in the neighboring countries, including Slovakia.

In Slovakia, langoš is street food that can be found where people may want an easy and delicious snack—train stations, festivals, even bus-stop kiosks.

The flat bread comprising langoš is very similar to Native American fry bread: it’s lightly fried, crispy and chewy, and it can be pulled apart or folded. Garlic, ketchup, cheese, and tartar sauce are the typical choices of condiments in Slovakia. The sweetness of ketchup or the creamy tang of tartar sauce nicely offset the strength of garlic.

Beware: Hungarians frown upon ketchup / tartar sauce as langoš condiments (I’ve heard them call it “sacrilege”). The beautiful thing is you can try different variations of langoš in several countries.

Needless to say, langoš goes very well with Slovak beer.

By Peter from I ♥ Slovakia.

Best Street Food in Europe - TheWingedFork

Did you like this list of the must try local and street food around the world? Maybe next time we’ll do a roundup of food streets, street food markets and street food festivals that you must visit.

PS. If you want to add something to this list of European street food, email me at abby@thewingedfork.com

This post may contain affiliate links. Click here to read the disclaimer.

Post Author: Abby

I'm a foodie and travel blogger, still making my way out of the daily 9-to-5, or 9-to-7 rather. But I make time to travel as often as possible. I've travelled across parts of Europe and Asia, and love writing about my experiences with people and cultures. And naturally, I love food, wine and travel, and have an endless bucket list of places to go to, and experiences I must blog about. My favorite things - nice rainy days, the smell of cakes in the oven, playing in the snow, glasses of wine and dark chocolate.

1 thought on “50+ Best Street Food in Europe

    Cecilia

    (6th November 2018 - 7:23 PM)

    oh my goodness, I am drooling from looking through your article. I love to have the most authentic street food when I travel, so I just loved this article. Will definitely pin it to save for later. Thanks!!!

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